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Using Your Mobile While Driving Could Invalidate Your Licence

It's been nearly a year since new regulations came into force to stop drivers from using their phones. They've been effective, but are you aware of the do's and don'ts?

Last March, new regulations came into force that allow traffic officers to fine drivers £200 and six penalty points for using a handheld mobile phone while driving. For drivers that have held their licence for less than two years, six points would cause them to automatically lose their licence. Within the first six months, 290 drivers had their licence disqualified and within the first nine months, 39,000 drivers were fined for using mobiles illegally while driving.

The threat of steep fines and penalties have been effective, as the number of drivers using their handheld mobile while driving has dropped by 29 per cent. However, there may be some instances where you feel it’s necessary to use your mobile, but you’re concerned about the potential consequences. To clear up any ambiguity, here’s what you can and cannot do with your mobile while behind the wheel:

  • Can: Listen to music or podcasts (as long as it is in a hands-free holder or connected by Bluetooth).
  • Can: Pull over to check your mobile as long as you are safely parked.
  • Can: Use sat-nav on your mobile as long as it is hands-free.
  • Can: Call 999 or 112 in an emergency when it is unsafe or impractical to stop your vehicle.
  • Cannot: Check social media or texts, even if you are queuing in traffic or stopped at a traffic light.
  • Cannot: Answer your mobile while driving. You can only answer the call if your mobile is hands-free. However, you should try to keep the conversation brief.


© 2018 Zywave, Inc. All rights reserved. This publication is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be exhaustive nor should any discussion or opinions be construed as compliance or legal advice. In relation to any particular problem which they may have, readers are advised to seek specific advice. Further, the law may have changed since first publication and the reader is cautioned accordingly.